Special podcast episodes explore allyship and DEI at AGU

By:

In May, we released the first in a series of special episodes of Third Pod from the Sun on allyship, discussing what AGU as an organization is doing to serve as an ally in our meetings and public policy.

Today, I am excited to announce the release of two more special podcast episodes exploring allyship and diversity, equity and inclusion featuring conversations with Billy Williams, AGU executive vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion and Lisa White, director of education and outreach at the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley, chair of AGU’s diversity and inclusion advisory committee and an Eos science advisor.

The first episode examines the history of AGU’s work in diversity, equity and inclusion, from its beginnings in 2000 up through our work today. We also discuss the challenges of the last year and what is happening within the larger Earth and space sciences community to improve diversity, equity and inclusion.

The second episode goes deeper into some of the new programs at AGU related to DEI, and our guests share some personal perspectives on the changes that have happened in Earth and space sciences over the past few decades.

The transcripts for the two-part discussion are pasted below.

I hope you enjoy these special episodes, and we look forward to sharing more perspectives and information in future conversations. If you have thoughts or ideas for future podcast episodes, please email us.

Episode one:

Randy W. Fiser: Hi, this is Randy Fiser CEO for AGU, and this is a Third Pod from the Sun takeover.

 

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This is the second podcast on allyship. The first was released May 3rd and is available on from the prowl and today’s episode is on AGU’s, diversity, equity, and inclusion, and we’ll be covering topics that include the history of AGU’s work, which officially started in early 2000. Long before my tenure began at AGU and culminated in our first DEI end report released in 2002, we’re also going to cover what’s happening within AGU, our programs, and an update on AGU landing and our eight action steps. And we’re going to look at what’s happening within our community and at large, and what’s next. Joining me to share their perspectives on these topics are Billy Williams, AGU’s executive vice president of diversity equity and inclusion, and Lisa White director of education and outreach at the museum of paleontology university of California, Berkeley. She is also the chair of AGU’s diversity inclusion advisory committee, as well as an EOS science advisor. Welcome to the episode Billy and Lisa.

 

Billy Williams: Thank you. Randy’s pleasure to be here.

 

Lisa White: Thank you, Randy. It’s my pleasure to be able to join this podcast.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

 

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Well, I am beyond excited to have the two of you here. You are both amazing leaders in the AGU community at large, but also your focus in on diversity, equity, inclusion has been incredibly admirable. I, as a person who’s devoted my life to DEI, I am just in awe of the work that you have done to advance earth and space science and the diversity, equity, inclusion needed in the community. So thank you so much for your work.

 

Billy Williams: It’s a privilege.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

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So with that, I would love to start off with a question to you, Billy. Could you talk about, a little bit about the longstanding history that AGU has had and its commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion?

 

Billy Williams:

 

 

 

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Yeah. Randy, I’m happy to AGU began working in Syria a long time before I joined AGU because I joined AGU in 2012, but back in the early two thousands, I think it was 2001 and 2002, the AGU established, they had a committee on education, human resources, and that group actually developed AGU’s first AGU Diversity Plan, and that plan was released in 2002. So even 20 years ago, AGU was working in this area, and that plan looked that had four major goals. The goals were around educating and involving membership in diversity issues, enhance the participation in the sciences and science educators and those from underrepresented groups at the time and increasing the visibility of earth based sciences in awareness of career opportunities, and then promoting change in the academic culture around the… and at that time, it was just called diversity and inclusion.

 

 

 

 

 

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So it was back then that AGU came out with this first diversity plan. But at the same time, in 2003, AGU actually convened the collaboration with 50 other scientific societies, demonstrating AGU’s willingness to be a leader in that arena of DEI at the time. So that was, again, that was before my time. I can’t tell you much about that convene of that conference in 2003, but there are some AGU members that are still around, who could probably tell you more about that. Since then, we’d been working towards those labs that were outlined in 2002.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

 

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That’d be great. Why don’t we expand on that a little bit? So you joined AGU, but it wasn’t actually in the role of leading diversity, equity and inclusion. So take me from the time that you arrived at AGU to where we are today.

 

Billy Williams:

 

 

 

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Yeah. That’s a great because when I joined AGU Randy, it was in 2012. I joined AGU as director of science, and because I came in as the director of science, I was also involved at, some involvement with ethics related issues with primarily ethics and publications. But at about that same time AGU was standing up or in the process of actually updating its ethics policy. So that was the first major update to AGU ethics policy that took place in the 2012, 2013 timeframe, about the same time I joined AGU. So, we started having ethics related meetings at fall meeting every year. So that was a point where that committee put ethics on the map for AGU. And then we took that forward through requiring people who joined our meetings to sign off on an ethics statement, having code meetings, code of conduct, all those things happened in the 2014 timeframe.

 

 

 

 

 

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And then around 2015, an issue of harassment and science became, came to the public view. A lot of people knew about harassment, but it was something that people weren’t talking about publicly, but there was a well-known case out at UC Berkeley, actually that, because it was close to home for AGU. We sponsored a town hall meeting on that topic in 2015. And from there we started getting… Members were reacting to the fact that we were proactive on addressing these things that previously had not been discussed. So my role in ethics, we saw it as an ethical issue, in 2017, we updated our ethics policy to include harassment, discrimination and bullying as scientific misconduct. So that happened in 2017, Randy, and we were the first organization scientific society and really name harassment as scientific misconduct.

 

Randy W. Fiser: That’s huge.

 

Billy Williams:

 

 

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Yeah, it was huge. And we were expecting the pushback, but we didn’t get the pushback because at the same time we were involved with the national Academy’s report that really spotlighted it harassment as a major issue in stem, and we were out in front and in addressing and being proactive about putting policies and practices in place. So that was really, I think over the past, since I’ve been at AGU, that was the period between 2015 and 2018. That really cemented us as being proactive, not afraid to take a stand and looking at addressing harassment as an ethics issue. And then my role in FTC ball because I was leading that charge. And that was before I became director of DEI, I was science director, but leading the charge with ethics in AGU, it’s been, we’ve been growing since that. Yeah.

 

Randy W. Fiser: So I want to bring you in, Lisa, a little bit in here, so what’s happening in your life around this time, this period in your connection to AGU?

 

Lisa White:

 

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Right. Well, I’m glad you asked because I joined AGU in 1985. So I was a graduate student at the time, but my first AGU fall meeting was I believe in ’82 or ’83 when I was an undergraduate at San Francisco State. And so obviously I’d benefited from the conference being in San Francisco every year. I initially went to meet a mentor, so I’d received a scholarship as an undergraduate and a mentor came along with the scholarship and he was going to be at AGU and so invited me to meet him. At the time, AGU was at one hotel, one single hotel in a different part of San Francisco. But I remember thinking that it was a very homogenous professional organization and the science was so vast. So I was pretty well focused on a classic geology degree at that time. I had not really connected with the space sciences or the atmospheric sciences. On the one hand it was a little bit intimidating, but I also found myself really inspired by the range of topics that were presented at an AGU meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

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As I became a regular attendee through graduate school, and then through my early professional years, as a faculty member at San Francisco State University, there were visible changes to the amount of diversity themed sessions at the fall meeting. I was running a program for pre college students in the early two thousands. And in 2003, I believe was the first bright star session. So students training as research scientists, a wonderful opportunity that continues today, for pre college students to present posters on their research. So I became more hopeful, in the beginning, my early years as a student member, I don’t know that I expected much around diversity from AGU. It was just so focused on trying to get my degree and doing what I could in other networks to promote diversity. So I was very excited as I saw some things were beginning to happen and I’m continued to be excited and optimistic about future opportunities, but yeah, it was a various slow change, but as Billy mentioned with some of those very important steps of establishing diversity as a priority there begin to see some change.

 

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Billy Williams:

 

 

 

 

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Yeah. Randy. If I could just jump in and add something to what Lisa said. She mentioned bright stars, bright stars was established back in the early two thousands. Well, before I came to AGU, but that’s a program that brings students into our fall meeting in middle school and high school and they present and I’m so proud when I go in to see a bright star student presenting, but that’s inspirational. So that’s something that happened early on for AGU and we’ve maintained that program til today, so sorry, Lisa, I just wanted to tack that in that, that started early on in AGU and it’s very inspirational still today.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

 

 

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With what you both have just shared both from the staff member perspective and then from the experience of being a member and a part of this community, it really does show the amount of years that have been dedicated to, and may surprise a lot of people to diversity, equity and inclusion at AGU. However, there’s still so much more that needs to be done. And the representation of the earth space science community is still sorely under-representative of the diversity that we would hope that it would be a part after 20 years of work.

 

 

 

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So I think it will be important in our conversation to talk a little about the why’s that it takes so much to change, but I know so much has been done in the last 14 months as it relates to the strategic plan, our dashboard, date action steps and AGU landing, not to mention other programs we have. So if we can maybe talk about the last 14 months with both of you and what has been happening in the world. Obviously there was a huge inflection point, not just COVID being an inflection point, but obviously the murder of George Floyd and the focus on this issue domestically in the U S. Your thoughts and obviously so much work between the two of you on this.

 

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Billy Williams:

 

 

 

 

 

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Yeah. If I could jump in, and then I’ll turn it over to Lisa, and just talk about what happened up to the last 18 months in terms of the progress is made from the early diversity plan was mostly around gender diversity. While we had efforts looking at diversity as a whole, the major progress was made in AGU between the early years and the two, and then most recent years around gender diversity. I would say that’s just in the last 18 to 24 months, you really see more happening around looking at the first, before other groups within AGU and especially around recognize issues around the marginalized groups of the historically underrepresented groups in AGU. I think Lisa can talk more about that, especially with work for the DNI committee.

 

Lisa White:

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Right, right. And obviously it goes without saying that a professional society that agrees to form a very visible diversity, equity and inclusion committee whose charge is thoroughly integrated with priorities of the society has an opportunity to be successful in a way that has not been my experience on some other diversity committees that frankly felt like window dressing, and I think the combination of the way that AGU structured our advisory committee and also coming on the heels of the task force, the strategic plan beforehand, the early years as we talked about that really did call for a need to focus, not only on the role of harassment and the experiences of women in earth science, but really visibly and prioritizing the experiences of underrepresented scientists and it’s been really a whirlwind two years since the advisory committee formed.

 

 

 

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We’ve got terrific membership that has so much experience in really many corners of not only DEI, but their stature and experiences as professional scientists and among some of our accomplishments have included additional kinds of diversity and inclusion programming at the fall meeting and really supporting efforts in society to expand the talent pool and support many of the programs that are in the ethics and equity office and the dashboard of course, which is such an important component and our ability to track how AGU is doing. And I’m also, I’ve been really excited by the number of alliances and collaborations and networks we’ve connected with that have led us to a whole series of webinars over this past year that were an important series of steps and really the call to action for all of our community to respond to a year that was unlike no other, the sort of triple pandemic, the health crisis and the George Floyd and Brianna Taylor murders, and the ongoing need to just wake up to doing things differently when it comes to making progress for underrepresented scientists.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

 

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So much has been happening and both on the need to step up and react because the things happening in our world, but also the, this is so important to earth science and the need to have the diversity of voices to deal with the diversity of challenges that we face in our world. Climate change to societal challenges. I think it really underpins why this is so important. You mentioned a couple of things. One is, the strategic plan obviously has DEI built in as a major goal. There’s the dashboard, which adds to transparency. There’s also the eight action steps that were put out, which really was not about going beyond the lip service component that you mentioned in alluded to Lisa, just window dressing and moving into saying, we have some measurable actions that we want to take, and we are going to hold ourselves accountable to that progress.

 

Lisa White:

 

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And Randy, something additional I wanted to mention is how much I value the way that AGU expectations tie the science priorities to DEI practices as well, whether it’s our science of understanding climate change and environmental change, sustainability and natural resources or hazards, and the need to be certain that we’re being equitable. As we share information with community. So programs like thriving earth exchange are of course, part of that connection to ensure the science priorities also are applying best DEI practices.

 

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Randy W. Fiser:

 

What does all of that in ability your mind mean to demonstrating the commitment that AGU has to this, and actually doing something about the overall challenge.

 

Billy Williams:

 

 

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We’ve done this and we can’t do this alone because some of the issues we’re dealing with are so big and have been around for a long time, as you all know. So we also partner and leverage with the others and through others to make some of these things happen. There’s so many other programs that we leverage in and partner on that we’re convinced, I’m convinced that we are moving the needle. It might be slow too many, but it’s across the broad spectrum of DEI related issues, whether it’s LGBTQ related issues or whether it’s, we’ve supported a new Asian American and Pacific Islanders group, they have started their own group, but we’re trying to provide them support to get them started as well in terms of some of the other arrestment and violence related issues that that community has experienced. So I’m very proud that we don’t take a narrower view that we take a broad view and we always put actions behind.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

 

 

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Yeah. That is incredibly powerful when you apply it to the work and the importance again, of the diversity to the work. And I know these are only some of the in-house DEI successes that we have had at AGU. And we’re going to need a part two, actually, to talk about some other things I want to thank everybody who has listened to this Third Pod from the Sun episode

 

Episode two

Randy W. Fiser: This is Randy Fiser, CEO for AGU, and I’d like to welcome you to part two of Third Pod From the Sun takeover on allyship.

 

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We are talking with Billy Williams, who is the executive vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion at AGU, and we are also talking with Lisa White who is director of education and outreach at the Museum of Paleontology at UC Berkeley. She’s also the chair of the AGU Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee, as well as an EO science advisor. And we’ve been talking about the work that AGU has been doing historically, and even in the most recent time, related to diversity, equity, inclusion. And I’d like to, in part two of this, go deeper into some new programs that are coming down the line, and also getting some perspectives on the changes that we’ve seen from particularly, Lisa, your perspective as a scientist that you feel have been taking place over the years.

 

 

 

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And I thought maybe we could start there. You mentioned when you started in AGU as an undergrad and attended your first meeting in San Francisco, that it was a very homogeneous group, and you had some programs that you were able to take advantage of within the organization, but you also started immediately stepping into some leadership roles within the broader community. So that’s a great history to pull from. So thinking about from where you started in geoscience to today, what can you tell me and our audience about what has changed or shifted in your mind, and your experience?

 

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Lisa White:

 

 

 

 

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I would say the shift to greater expectations among the leaders in geoscience. I think about the initial diversity programs that I directed as a faculty member at San Francisco State University, and they were very focused on the student experience. We were working from a framework that today we would call fixing the student. It was very much assumed that something was lacking in the background or training of the students, perhaps their high school was inadequate, or they didn’t have the right kind of exposure to science or lacked role models. And so we were busy trying to mold them as we saw, as a scientist should be. And we’d use terms like “the pipeline.” You have to get students in the pipeline, as if there was only one way you could enter a career path in geoscience.

 

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Randy W. Fiser:

 

 

 

 

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Yeah, that’s great experience to share and an observation about how careers progress. We used to talk about this as there’s no longer a career ladder, it’s a career lattice, and giving that people the opportunity to move into different areas and pathways to advance their life. Most people don’t want to be in the same job 40 years of their life now, and movement around organizations and within organizations and within institutions and within careers. The depth and the breadth that you get from that is so powerful. So acknowledging that and rewarding that is such a wonderful thing.

 

Lisa White:

 

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So thank goodness we’re more enlightened now, and you hear analogies that are closer to pathways over pipelines, acknowledging that students, early careers, young people bring a lot of different kinds of experiences to studying sciences that we should embrace and respect. And we should also look at ourselves, look at the culture and climate that we present students with in departments, in professional societies. And it’s not them some of the time. It could be us and the institutions that are so traditional, that can frankly be a complete turnoff to students that we hope to attract to the discipline. I’m grateful that more of the burden is on those who are in a position to shape programs, make systemic changes, and lead in a way that will hopefully result in longer-lasting change. And I know Billy will highlight the AGU LANDInG Academy, which is really about building those skills in professionals to shape change in departments.

 

Randy W. Fiser: Before we get onto AGU LANDInG, Billy, you have started your career at Dow Chemical, and you’re now at AGU. So if you wouldn’t mind doing similarly as Lisa did, sharing what you’ve seen change in the world over that tenure of your career.

 

Billy Williams:

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Thanks, Randy. Happy to. So a lot has changed over my tenure. I’ve spent my entire career in science, although at different scientific related organizations. My longest tenure was with the American chief, with the Dow Chemical company. Then I worked at the National Academy of Sciences and then over the past eight years with AGU.

 

 

 

 

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So I’m a chemist by training. I call myself a synthetic organic chemist by training. Although, if you put me in the lab today, I probably that would destroy the whole thing. So it’s been a while. But in chemistry, I remember back in my early days at Dow that there weren’t a lot of black chemists. There were a few. And I remember attending my first meeting of the National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers. It was held in Boston, Massachusetts. This was in the early 80s, and I didn’t realize how homogenous my world was until I attended that meeting and saw this breadth of other black chemist high profile chemists in the meeting. And so I knew I wasn’t alone anymore. Not that it had inhibited my career, but I felt like, oh yeah. So there are other people like me and we can get some stuff done.

 

 

 

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So from that period on, I’ve always looked for role models. And I’ve also tried to act as a mentor to others when I could. So I think one of the things that have changed over that period of time from the time I was using other chemists as role models and they weren’t all black either, is that you have a wider breadth of mentors who can help support your career. You see a more diverse group of mentors who are available, and you see people in higher level positions than there were in the 90s or late 80s. And so a lot has changed in terms of the participation. And this was not in the geo sciences, but in stem as a whole, I would say that we’ve seen some brightening of activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The other thing I will say is the international perspective, because at AGU, again, we are an organization at 40% of our members are outside the US, and so you can’t have a singular US view of diversity. And I had some international experience while I was at Dow, and I think that’s come to serve me well here in this position. So I think this view of DEI, what it means more broadly, more holistically is important as well. And that has changed over the past 10 years or so.

 

 

 

 

 

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But one final point building on what Lisa is saying in terms of expectations. I think mentorship in the past for people in science has been if you’re a mentor that the people in authority were gatekeepers. They were there to probably kick people out as opposed to being groundskeepers, who are there to cultivate and make sure people when they come in and can thrive. And I heard somebody use that analogy, and I really love it because I think that’s been the shift from people in authority positions in geo sciences for being gatekeepers, to keep people out, to be in groundskeepers to cultivate people when they come in. So I like that shift, that we’re still going through it, but we have gone through that.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

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What a great way of framing that, and such a great history from both of you, and really interesting to watch the trajectory of Dao as well as a company. Now being led by an openly gay man and the president of North America, who happens to be a good friend of mine, Louis Vega is Hispanic and openly gay as well. They really have made some great strides, as AGU has in its organization as having a CEO who happens to also be openly gay. And senior leadership in the organization reflective of our society.

 

 

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And you mentioned mentorship, and a real important component of that I think is embedded into AGU landing. And I’d like to kind of pivot the conversation to that program that Lisa you mentioned earlier, because it is new for AGU, but builds off of the great history of work that we’ve been doing. So Billy and Lisa, could you talk to us a little bit about AGU LANDInG and what the framework of that is and where it’s going and how people can engage.

 

Billy Williams:

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So I’ll start on this, Lisa, if you don’t mind. So LANDInG is a program envisioned to develop and cultivate cohorts of AGU DEI leaders in geo sciences. So in this program, we will bring through, I’m going to call it classes, cohorts of individuals who are poised for leadership and to influence at their institutions, and give them the expert exposure and experiences that will allow them to truly make change and lead others. So that’s part number one in LANDInG.

 

[00:10:30] Part number two is to establish a LANDInG community of practice where we will have a rich library of resources and tools and webinars and experiences, so anyone can come into the community of practice regardless of what your background is or where you’re starting and cultivate a path where you can gain and learn more.

 

That’s great. Go ahead, Lisa.

 

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Lisa White:

 

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Yeah. Randy, and I’m excited to be an advisor to AGU LANDInG, and Billy said so many key things that we need to expect from leaders if we are to initiate change and sustain it. And one is to admit that leaders need training. So many academic professionals assume their leadership positions because they’ve been there a long time, or it was their turn to be chair or a Dean opening came their way. But there’s often not much in our background that gives us some of those necessary skills that you need, especially around diversity and inclusion. And so recognizing offering a series of opportunities through the training of cohorts of individuals, having a library of resources that will be readily available is key.

 

 

 

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And I wanted to mention also that it’s easy to take for granted words like diversity, equity, inclusion. We use them so much now, but there’s a reason why we do need to attach equity and inclusion in any conversations about diversity. Because just because you might be hiring an additional a person of color, or you’ve expanded the gender balance in the department does not mean that everyone is being treated equally or has all of the opportunities to advance in the same way. And so we need to make sure our community is very well well-educated on what kinds of practices it really does take to have a truly inclusive department, or university, or unit where people can Excel and lead themselves. And so embracing that need for training and take opportunities to do just that I think is really important to our community.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

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Such a wonderful program in such important observations, Lisa. I know throughout my career being in cohort programs and leadership programs have been incredibly important to my success. Going to your point earlier, Billy, it helped to push through those gatekeepers and those folks who weren’t necessarily helping to bring you through the organization, but having that network that helped to break through those ceilings that existed were important in my life, and then building off of something you said, Lisa, is that when I was able to be in a position to return that gift that was given to me, the importance of getting trained in how to be a mentor and how to help to bring people through their career goals and through their career things and not apply my career goals to them and sort of say, “This is the pathway, follow it.” But to instead be there to support, to nurture, to listen, to care, and then love the observation around the inclusive environment that’s necessary in an organization in order for diversity to grow and to prosper.

 

 

 

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And I know it is really important to listen and to observe that environment that you believe you’re creating within your organization, but to see that translate into behaviors and actions within the whole organization as a whole, and not just be lip service is so important. Such profound words from both of you. I know we could go on for hours on all of this, but we don’t have hours.

 

 

 

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So I would love to maybe, with this last question is to pose a question to both of you for the folks who are listening. And the theme of this is around allyship, which really is folks who may be in a position to assist others different from themselves in … Or similar to themselves, because they might be in a position of authority now, to reach out. So what can individuals do, or what can institutions and organizations like AGU do to continue to make movement forward around all of these really important issues? And Lisa, I’ll turn it to you for that to start.

 

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Lisa White:

 

 

 

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Thank you. Well, I was having a conversation with some co-PIs on a new project, where we were distinguishing between mentoring and allyship. And they are different. And we said, after some discussion, that mentors are typically appointed, and there’s a hierarchy in a mentor-mentee relationship. But allies are invited. They’re invited in your space, and there is an expectation that they not try to … I don’t know if interfere is the right word, but an ally should be a support to an individual that may still be figuring out their career. And there’s some things to be learned in all of that, because it’s tempting sometimes to overreach. So many of us are motivated, re-motivated to invest in diversity, equity, inclusion. And you often don’t know exactly where to start, or you bring some of your own baggage, frankly, to and ally-allyship interaction, because one might be trying to work out what was missing in their own training.

 

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And so I think we want to continue to challenge members of our community to do this work for the right reasons. That we have our focus on what’s really good for the enterprise. And sometimes we have to take our personal selves out of it in order to be good allies, good supporters, and ones who are willing to work for change over the long haul and not be too distracted or discouraged by short-term gain. We really do need to commit to this for the long run.

 

Randy W. Fiser: That’s wonderful. Billy, some final words from you.

 

Billy Williams:

 

 

 

[00:19:30]
Yeah. Yeah. Great. Just to build on what Lisa just said, I think allyship is something that we’re all capable of. So you don’t have to look for somebody else to do that to be an ally, so why aren’t you doing something? Just something we need to look to ourselves to be involved with. And also we’ll say that if you want to get involved, don’t know how, there are webinars, training. Contact me, we can get you set up to [inaudible 00:19:38] how to be an ally. And the other thing I will say is that one of the things about AGU leadership is that AGU leadership goes now through some form of diversity inclusion training on a biannual basis.

 

 

[00:20:00]
And so if you are out there, don’t know where to start, do two things. Look up AGU LANDInG and get involved there. Or you can contact me if you want to know more about allyship, and how you can make some changes of your own. So thank you for that question.

 

Randy W. Fiser:

 

 

[00:20:30]
Sure. And as somebody who’s been working in this area for over 30 years, the continuous and lifelong learning is so important, you can never stop learning, and you can never have learned too much. And I think your component about that, the commitment to allyship or diversity, equity, inclusion, isn’t a moment in time. It is a lifelong journey, and I love that.

 

 

 

 

 

[00:21:00]
And obviously AGU as an organization is on that journey as well, and as an institution learning and evolving and changing. And so much of that is because of the work that you two have put into this organization, and into this profession as a whole. So I want to thank you both so much for your dedication, your leadership, your commitment, and for your you’re selfish and servant leadership. Selfless, I should say, sorry. I said selfish, didn’t I. Selfless and servant leadership that you provided to this community. I’m humbled to be in your presence.

 

 

[00:21:30]
And with that, I also want to say thank you to our audience for attending this part two of our podcast on diversity, equity, inclusion, and allyship. This is your Third Pod From the Sun takeover, and I am Randy Fiser, CEO of AGU. And I want to thank Billy Williams and Lisa White, for again, their leadership. And for joining me on this podcast. Thank you.

 

 

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